Wrestlemania XXX Blu-ray Review

Welcome to the heart of the WWE’s PG-era shenanigans

Wrestlemania XXX gave fans what they wanted. Fans wanted Daniel Bryan? They saw him twice. They like Antonio Cesaro? He scored a key victory. They wanted t-shirts with a new Undertaker victory number?

In retrospect, maybe it wasn’t entirely what fans wanted.

Thirty years later, Wrestlemania’s energy proved infectious until it wasn’t. With a wildly entertaining pre-show bout, a “better than it should have been” Andre the Giant Battle Royal, and a scruffy rumble with Daniel Bryan battering HHH, Wrestlemania XXX ignited.

And then John Cena happened. Then Brock Lesnar versus the Undertaker happened. Everything died. For the sheer online brutality the WWE receives during this proclaimed, “PG-era,” at times it is deserved. Decision making and booking is often head shaking, yet the show’s opening salvos were more than competent – they were spectacular. Consistency was apparently not the focal point.

Every Wrestlemania has those moments and so does every pro wrestling show: Some matches or angles don’t work. For WM 30, it turned into a collection of back half ruts which were inescapable. Cena and Bray Wyatt’s storytelling maneuvers may have been obvious, yet their actions sagged into boredom. After further shocks surrounding The Undertaker’s bout – fantastic twist or otherwise – there was no vibrancy left in the live crowd or at home.

But, WM 30 was memorable. While these later yearly editions have begun to bleed together, stand out moments were many. Hulk Hogan, Steve Austin, and The Rock performed admirably as they shared the mic in a superfluous introduction. Kofi Kingston landed a miracle spot to stay active inside of the Battle Royale. Main event Triple Threat action, even if lost in the final hour’s haze, was still a dazzling send off. This was a fun show if you can peer through the veil of hate.

Movie ★★★☆☆ 

Paul Orndorff @ 3:13:50

There’s a reason DoBlu features so little WWE content: It all looks the same. You can flashback and read any of our WM Blu-ray reviews. The technical content remains identical between all. With a smidgen over four hours of content on one disc, there exists almost no means to swerve around the nature of compression artifacts, and they remain severe.

Mosquito noise surrounds the wrestlers. The crowd remains baked in a mass of visible encoding. Flashes or pyro during introductions are host to countless visible blocks of digitization. Skin turns plastic. Fidelity is mediocre.

WWE Home Video rises ever so minimally above cable broadcasts. This 1080i video is limited by its source, and even if the company were to split between two discs, it’s doubtful the differences would prove striking. Production truck work saps much of the life from the images.

A savior exists in saturation, WM 30’s set housing an intense palette of hues. Standard ring views explode with wild costuming and their kooky vibrancy. Crowd depths portray a slate of perfect black levels too, enhancing density.

Video ★★☆☆☆ 

Dolby Digital still exists in the realm of Blu-ray, and with limited space left over from video compression, there is no avoiding the DVD-era codec in the realm of WWE programming. As live crowds continue to become invested in the product, hearing those “Yes!” chants reverberate through the arena has heightened these 5.1 mixes with some surround flexibility. It’s strong, if under the restrictions set by the waning functionality of Dolby Digital itself.

Audio ★★★☆☆ 

Tradition continues with a second disc holding the entirety of the three and a half hour long Hall of Fame ceremony. This year’s notable inductees include Ultimate Warrior (who passed away mere days after the show) and Mr. T. A countdown of 30 iconic Wrestlemania moments coincides with a small paperback book included with most editions of this release. What’s left? Ten promo spots, ranging from hype interviews to a (brief) look at Hulk Hogan’s career. Little here is worth taking in.

Extras ★★★☆☆ 

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Click on the images below for full resolution screen captures taken directly from the Blu-ray. Images have not been altered in any way during the process.